Thu , September 21 2017

Proper plates please, say British diners

With more and more eateries serving food in gimmicky ‘plates’, a YouGov Survey has revealed that most British diners still prefer traditional styles of tableware.

To see exactly what the public is willing to eat their food off, YouGov Omnibus showed 2,030 Brits a series of unconventional eating vessels (drawn from popular Twitter feed @WeWantPlates) and asked the question: ‘Assuming they were clean, do you think it is acceptable or unacceptable for a restaurant, café or pub to serve food on or in the following items?’

Of the objects shown, 99% preferred a circular plate, followed by 96% opting for a square plate. A total of 69% felt fine with slate, while 64% were relaxed with a wooden board and 53% were happy with plant pots.

The ‘least acceptable’ means of presenting food were a flooring panel (28%), jar (18%), shovel (17%), dog bowl (10%) and shoe (9%).

YouGov data journalist Matthew Smith said: “Unsurprisingly, the standard circular plate was the least controversial vessel –pretty much everyone believes they are an acceptable way to serve food.

“The results also show that William Sitwell seems to have lost the war on square plates, as 96% of Brits consider them an appropriate surface for food. (In 2014, the ‘MasterChef’ judge apparently described square plates as ‘an abomination’.)

“Slates and wooden boards also receive the backing of the majority of Brits. Both are staples of restaurants and gastropubs attempting to affect a classier atmosphere. Perhaps as a result, they are the only two vessels on which there’s a noticeable difference between working and middle class opinion.

“Those in the ABC1 social grades (middle class) are 12 percentage points more likely to consider slates acceptable than those in the C2DE social grades (working class), and 8 points more likely when it comes to wooden boards.”

He concluded: “While this selection of unusual culinary conveya4nces may cause some to raise their brows and roll their eyes, we may see more of them in future.

“The results also show that younger Brits are generally more likely than their elder peers to consider it okay to serve food on or in unconventional items.”

 

PHOTOS: @WeWantPlates @SummerRay

Check Also

Jamie holds top spot in The Sunday Times best sellers

Jamie Oliver’s new cookbook is number one in the ‘The Sunday Times’ list of bestselling …